Category Archives: Parenting

“Easy to Love…” Book Giveaway!

Have you been excited to read the anthology of parent essays I keep blogging about, Easy to Love But Hard to Raise: Real Parents, Challenging Kids, True Stories, but you haven’t gotten around to buying it? Now’s your chance to win a free copy!

Co-editor Kay Marner is offering three free copies on her blog over at ADDitude Magazine, a publication for families touched by Attention Deficit (ADD) and Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorders (ADHD).

Kay writes about a fictional Everyparent, Eve, who struggles to manage her child who suffers from ADHD. To enter to win a copy of Easy to Love… you only need to comment on her blog with which parts of Eve you most identify.

From her blog:

“Are You Eve? In other words, is your personal experience reflected in this fictional portrayal? What do you identify with, and what doesn’t match your own parenting experience? (Grandparents, teachers, and others are welcome to answer by relating their own perspectives.)

Contest Rules: Answer the above questions in a comment below by 5:00 pm EST on Friday, March 2, 2012 for a chance to win one of three free copies of Easy to Love but Hard to Raise: Real Parents, Challenging Kids, True Stories ($18.95 retail value).”

Don’t let me confuse you into posting your answer here on my blog, but be sure to go to Kay’s and post there. And hey, even if you don’t win a free copy, maybe you’ll find a little catharsis?

Religion and Assisted Reproduction

Although faith wasn’t a consideration for me when I chose to become an egg donor, nor when we chose to use a sperm donor, for some religion can be a major force when contemplating fertility options.

Check out Ellen Painter Dollar’s piece in yesterday’s Huffington Post offering tips to people of faith when they’re considering infertility and assisted reproduction.

Dollar expands on her discussion of tip #2, moral questions, in her blog post, and further in her new book No Easy Choice: A Story of Disability, Parenthood, and Faith in an Age of Advanced Reproduction.

Like many aspects of our lives, the decision on how we become parents can be complex and nuanced, where right and wrong are moving targets that depend on where you’re standing. Dollar is stimulating the discussion and brave to tackle it head on.

Photo courtesy of www.yourspiritualfaith.com.

Bicycling for Social Change

I haven’t spoken much about my love of bicycling here since I injured my knee last year, but today, thanks to bloggers Cathy Belben and Laural Ringler, I got to see this short documentary about How the Dutch Got Their Bike Paths. One might think they’ve always been there, as a part of their culture, but as this doc mentions, the lanes were fought for by the country’s citizens on behalf of their children’s safety.


I love to cycle, and vastly prefer it over car travel, but I don’t do it as often as I’d like because many of the places I need to go in my moderate-sized progressive town do not offer a safe route for me when my children are in tow.

I think we’re heading in the right direction with alternative transportation, however slowly. So even when that thoughtless cyclist cuts you off in traffic, crosses three lanes without signaling, or makes you late for your appointment, remember to support cyclists for what they do for our community. They conserve oil and protect our air quality, they improve the physical health of our community and decrease traffic, and they are safer for our children than vehicles. Lobby for safe biking. There are many ways to get there and cars are only one. Let’s think bigger, together.

More Online Support of Sensory Processing Disorder

Check out my most recent blog post over at Easy to Love But Hard to Raise about new Facebook pages dedicated to supporting individuals and families dealing with Sensory Processing Disorder.

The editors of Easy to Love… have also announced a call for submissions for their next book, Easy to Love But Hard to Teach. Do you have something to share?

Easy to Love…Transitions?

My blog post today over at Easy to Love But Hard to Raise is about a new resource I found that will hopefully help ease our transition next year into a different program at the boy’s school. Check it out and wish us luck!

“Easy to Love…” is Finally Here!

I’m so proud to announce the official release of the anthology that my essay, Finding My Way, appears in, Easy to Love But Hard to Raise: Real Parents, Challenging Kids, True Stories, edited by Kay Marner and Adrienne Ehlert Bashista of DRT Press, and now available in paperback and Kindle. I’m proud to be part of a collection of essays by so many dedicated and wonderful parents who go the extra mile for their children, as well as a few world renowned parenting experts.

I hope to do a reading at Village Books in April and will post that info here first. As always, I also continue to post at the blog, Easy to Love, that accompanies the book, which is meant to support parents of children who need more. Thank you to all my friends, family, and supporters!

Malia Jacobson: A Writer’s Role Model

Blogging can feel selfish at times because I get to choose what I write about every day, and no matter the subject, the perspective is all me, me, me. But one of the topics I most enjoy is highlighting the work of others who inspire me as a writer and a human being.

Pacific Northwest writer, Malia Jacobson and I took Christina Katz’ writing class, Writing and Publishing the Short Stuff, at the same time a couple of years ago. Since then Malia has been knocking it out of the park. I have been following her regularly on Facebook and her Website. Her flourishing writing career continually pushes me to keep at it.

Of course, she was a successful writer before she took Christina’s class, but what she has accomplished since is impressive. She now has more than 150 credits in over 60 publications (these numbers may be higher because she has 14 articles in January ’12 publications alone), with many in national magazines like Costco Connection and Women’s Health Magazine.

Malia is successful for many reasons (talent, dedication, and hard work to name a few), but I think she would agree that specializing and becoming an expert in a couple specific areas has been a boon to her career. I’m most familiar with her experience as a sleep journalist. She studies and writes about how to get your kids to sleep better and how sleep (or the lack of it) affects the whole family, including us tired parents.

I recommend Malia’s e-book, Ready, Set, Sleep: 50 Ways to Help Your Child Sleep, So You Can Sleep Tooto all my friends in this struggle. Its full of helpful tips for diet, exercise, and other approaches that will get everyone in the family the rest they need dearly.

In December Malia appeared on Seattle’s King 5 News segment, Parent to Parent, to talk about one of her articles focused on how to raise moral kids, which is no small feat in today’s crazy world.

What I admire most about Malia is how she’s able to balance work and life. She is an accomplished writer with diverse publication credits and strong professional relationships while fulfilling her roles as dedicated wife and mom to her young children. She still finds time to bake cookies, clean house, and maintain her blog, Family in Progress. She’s someone we can relate to and aspire to emulate.

Way to go Malia, and thanks for being an inspiration to us all.